Redding Gets $342,000 Grant Toward Mark Twain Library Parking Lot

  • Comment
The Mark Twain Library will renovate its parking lot.
The Mark Twain Library will renovate its parking lot. Photo Credit: Mark Twain Library Facebook page

REDDING, Conn. -- The town of Redding has been awarded a $342,000 grant for parking lot improvements to the Mark Twain Library.

The funding will be used to expand and improve the parking, which is currently very limited, and make improvements to the drainage and septic system infrastructure. It will also improve accessibility to the historic library. 

“The Mark Twain Library is an invaluable cultural and social center for our community, and I’m thrilled these funds will help accommodate an increasing number of folks to enjoy the services and programs,” said Rep. John Shaban (R-Redding). “It’s been a huge priority for me to return these tax dollars to Redding so that expansion of accessible parking could be made possible for young and old alike.”

“Mark Twain Library is an educational and recreational treasure within the Town of Redding, but is hampered by inadequate parking,” said state Rep. Dan Carter (R-Redding). “The library receives the majority of its financial support through town funding, but has not been easily accessible to those very taxpayers. I’m very pleased this grant will make visiting and utilizing the library easier for residents of all ages.”

The lawmakers lobbied the Governor’s Office and the Office of Policy and Management for months, including multiple written requests, to push for the grant’s approval.

The library receives 65 percent of its funding through the town of Redding, and relies in large part on private contributions.

The Mark Twain Library, founded by the legendary author and humorist, is a private, non-profit corporation that provides free library services to the Town of Redding.

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy announced the series of grants under the state’s Small Town Economic Assistance Program, which were awarded to 27 towns throughout Connecticut for the purposes of funding a variety of economic development, community conservation and quality-of-life projects.

“These small town grants allow the state to partner with municipalities on projects that will help improve our communities, rebuild our infrastructure, and create jobs,” Malloy said in a statement. “These are investments that will make our towns a better place to live and work, will increase the quality of life, and help attract economic development and growth.”

  • Comment

Comments