Connecticut Association For The Gifted Receives $10,000 Grant

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The Westport-based Connecticut Association for the Gifted recently received a $10,000 grant from the Fairfield County Community Foundation. Photo Credit: Courtesy Connecticut Association For the Gifted

WESTPORT, Conn. -- The Westport-based Connecticut Association for the Gifted has received a $10,000 grant from the Fairfield County Community Foundation. 

The grant is set to "generate awareness of the needs of gifted and high-potential children in all socio-economic, cultural, and racial groups, to generate support for strengthening education for gifted and high-potential students and to let Fairfield County residents know that CAG is the best resource to meet the needs of gifted and high-potential students," a press release said. 

The Connecticut Association for the Gifted representatives said the project was important for several reasons because it will: 

  • Enable many unrecognized high-potential children to reach their full potential by identifying, encouraging, and capitalizing on their strengths
  • Have long-term benefits for the local communities, Fairfield County and Connecticut by providing more and better-prepared high-ability young adults from diverse communities to fill the demanding jobs required in the fast-changing global economy.

“I am tremendously grateful to the Fairfield County Community Foundation for recognizing the need to identify all gifted and high-potential students, and assure they achieve the promise they are capable of,” said CAG Board President John Pellino.

For more information, visit the Connecticut Association for the Gifted website or call 203-968-8033.

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mrague:

I am very glad to see that this organization exists and that it is being supported by the community. The needs of gifted children and adolescents have been long ignored. These children and adolescents are a national treasure, and their gifts and potentials need to be appreciated and developed. They are as much special needs children as are other special needs children. And, as adolescents, they are at high risk, given the fact that they are frequently misunderstood by the adults entrusted to care for them. A good first step forward. Margaret Rague JD, ND
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